Neo Saltano : The Competition

While I was in Georgia Tech’s School of Architecture, working on a project to design a Quaker Meeting House, I became fascinated with a poem by J.R.R.Tolkien entitled Kortirion among the Trees that spoke of a fading Elven town upon a hill, surrounded by trees. I explored that poem, using it as the literary springboard for my design that quarter. While the project faded quickly from memory, Tolkien’s poem did not. My personal ideas about Kortirion eventually led me to the creation of a city of my own that I began to call Neo Saltano. A few years later I tried to spark my fellow Tech graduates and some new acquaintances in the architecture world to participate in a competition to help sketch in some details about Neo Saltano, but work and a resounding lack of responses got in the way and I was forced to leave that city unexplored. But now the chance is returning. My friend Elliott has shown interest in making Neo Saltano into a January show at his Decatur gallery, one aspect of which will be an architectural design competition in various mediums. If you’re interested in participating contact the Boswell Gallery for more information and keep checking back here for the story of Neo Saltano.

I Lost Reese Witherspoon’s Wedding Ring

I lost Reese Witherspoon's Wedding Ring - Drewprops

Did I ever tell you about the time that I lost Reese Witherspoon’s $4,000 custom-made wedding ring from Tiffany’s? About how I had visions of ending my film career by being stomped to a pulp by Disney’s studio goons and Tiffany’s prissy New York jewelers? I didn’t? Well obviously it all worked out for the best, and it’s hardly as exciting as it sounds, but I figure the statute of limitations has run out and it’s safe to tell the whole story…
Continue reading I Lost Reese Witherspoon’s Wedding Ring

Magnolia Blossoms

Beautiful Magnolia Blossom
This is probably a boring post but I’ve been meaning to do it, so there. I grew up ‘neath the shade of a fine example of the ancient plant genus known as Magnolia, part of a family of plants believed to be over 95 million years old. Our magnolia belonged to the subgenus Magnolia grandiflora, better known as the “Southern magnolia”, star of stage, screen and stereotype of the Mint-Julep-sipping American South. Paleobotanists say that the magnolia family has outlasted mountain ranges, ice ages and continental drift, finding itself spread around the world in the process, from Asia to the Americas. Back in its prime this tree was undoubtedly the favorite food of more than a few kinds of dinosaur, an electrifying concept. Its limbs, its leaves, its fruit, its very essence is imbued with a peculiar, tart odor. I imagine it to be the primal scent of Dinosaurtown.
Continue reading Magnolia Blossoms