The Time I Met Gary Duncan

I’ve been thinking about my dad a lot this week. One memory in particular. It was the late 1980s and I was still a college student. We were at the Burger King in Arrowhead Plaza, in Jonesboro. We had already eaten and were heading back out to the car when we spotted a strange looking truck parked off to the side of the restaurant facing toward highway 19/41.

The truck looked like it was covered with scaffolding – interconnected pipe rails ran from the front of the truck to the back, and the bed resembled a set of risers stepping down to the ground the further back it went. It looked crazy.

Behind that truck was a strange Continue reading The Time I Met Gary Duncan

2018 Georgia Film Day Call for Submissions

Thanks everyone! The video is complete and should run on Tuesday the 27th at the Georgia State Capitol and on the internet soon afterward. With this effort completed I have removed the upload link. We couldn’t have done this without contributions from the local community and I wanted to say thanks to those who had time to help out. The final cut is tight and is weighted toward clips with good lighting and clear audio. All the clips in the final were further trimmed so we could show a lot in a short amount of time. What I’m saying is: you may not be in the final – but you will likely be shared with the Governor and legislature soon after. Continue reading 2018 Georgia Film Day Call for Submissions

Dad’s Time Machine

It’s closing in on two years since I lost my dad. His memory dominates my thoughts tonight because I just finished spending a few hours working on cleaning up the basement where he kept nearly everything he had ever owned. It’s a combination of junk pile and museum. I like to think of it as a time machine for traveling back and spending more time with my dad, because his presence is so strong in that place.

Two years flies by quickly.

I was certain that the first year after his passing would be the hardest, and it was so terribly difficult in so many ways. The grief hit me the worst around 6 months after his passing, which coincided with his birthday. I never cry, but I sure did cry a lot that month.

My mother and I had spent so much of our time as caregivers we had ignored taking care of ourselves and we were ragged that first year. I had no idea of how badly in need of a reset I was.

Instinctively, I began avoiding stress. If I had the ability to eliminate something that made me feel bad, it was gone – whether it was a situation or a specific person. I circled my wagons and took care of myself.

I’m still doing that.

Even as my world was shrinking I was gaining perspective.

Cleaning up Dad’s Time Machine has been great therapy for me. It might take a few more years, but I’ll get there eventually.

And you will too.